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Review

Cancer Research Frontiers. 2017; 3(1): 64-71. doi: 10.17980/2017.64

Primary Percutaneous Coronary Interventions in Cancer Patients

Cezar Iliescu1, Despina Tsitlakidou2, Dana Elena Giza1, Konstantinos Marmagkiolis 3

  • 1- The Department of Cardiology, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ciliescu@mdanderson.org, DEGiza@mdanderson.org
  • 2- Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA, despina1023@gmail.com
  • 3- Florida Hospital, Pepin Heart Institute, Tampa, FL, USA, marmagiolis@gmail.com

 

*Corresponding author: Konstantinos Marmagkiolis MD, MBA, FACC, FSCAI, Florida Hospital, Pepin Heart Institute, Tampa, FL, USA. 3100 E Fletcher Ave, Tampa, FL 33613. Email: c.marmagiolis@gmail.com

Citation: Cezar Iliescu, et al. Primary Percutaneous Coronary Interventions in Cancer Patients. Cancer Research Frontiers. 2017; 3(1): 64-71. doi: 10.17980/2017.64

Copyright: @ 2017: Cezar Iliescu, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Competing Interests: The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Received Nov 6, 2016; Revised Mar 27, 2017; Accepted Apr 4, 2017. Published Jun 1, 2017

 

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease and cancer increasingly coexist, therefore optimum management is required in order to treat the underlying malignancy and to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases. Primary PCI in patients with active cancer and coronary artery disease presents particular challenges for clinicians. Special considerations include radiation and chemotherapy-induced vascular damage, primary or secondary thrombocytopenia, presence of coagulopathies, vascular access complications and increased risk of stent thrombosis. Although PCI is performed in a minority of cancer patients, it is not associated with worse long‐term cardiovascular outcomes. Conservative management of ACS in cancer patients offers poor survival rates. In the majority of cancer patients with acceptable prognosis or cancer survivors, well planned and performed PCI is probably the best option.

Key Words: PCI, STEMI, NSTEMI, myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, cardiovascular disease

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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